He’s no oil painting!

Dominican friar, Girolamo Savonarola

Dominican friar, Girolamo Savonarola

If burning books is bad consider this control freak…

Florence, Feb 7-1497

Girolamo Savonarola was the mastermind (I use the term loosely) behind the burning of several of Sandro Botticelli’s paintings, and other works of a pagan theme. Only religious icons were permitted to survive his public ‘Bonfire of the Vanities.’ Fortunately some of Botticelli’s famous works like the ‘Birth of Venus’ and the ‘Primavera’ were painted furniture panels for a private residence in the country too far from the eyes of Savonarola’s personal army of boy spies.

SAVED: The 'Birth of Venus' - Sandro Botticelli

SAVED: The ‘Birth of Venus’ – Sandro Botticelli

Savonarola stirred the Florentines into a holier than art frenzy, and burned books, silk dresses, game boards, mirrors, jewelry, statues, perfumes, cosmetics, wigs, and anything labeled as items celebrating the sins of decadence and vanity.

He was born the same year as Leonardo da Vinci, and martyred in 1498

But the Dominican priest went a fire too far and was arrested as a heretic, and subsequently sacrificed as a martyr on his own pyre.

The execution of Savonarola 1498

The execution of Savonarola 1498

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About Veronica Knox

Veronica Knox has a Fine Arts Degree from the University of Alberta, where she studied Art History, Classical Studies, and Painting. In her career as a graphic designer, illustrator, private art teacher, and ‘fine artist,’ she has also worked with the brain-injured and autistic, developing new theories of hand-to-eye-to-mind connection. Veronica lives on the west coast of Canada, supporting local animal rescue shelters, painting, writing, editing other author’s novels, and championing the conservation of tigers and elephants, and their habitats. Her artwork and visuals to support ‘Second Lisa’ may be viewed on her website - www.veronicaknox.com
This entry was posted in Adoration, Books, Fine Art, Historical Fiction, Lost Paintings, Sandro Botticelli and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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