Tag Archives: Second Lisa the novel

Leonardo’s Pocket Camera

Small ‘libricini’ (pocket sized notebooks) recorded whatever image took Leonardo’s fancy. They were tied to his belt, and captured more detail than an ‘Instamatic.’ Notations of color, size, and even the weather was important to document, as it designated the … Continue reading

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The Saddest Words in Art…

 NOW LOST… These two devastating words have inspired most of my novels. I write about missing art and the lost lives of artists and their forgotten models who, over time, have become the anonymous heroes and heroines of art. While … Continue reading

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Nothing Up Her Sleeve

Stuff happens… The lower third of this painting by Leonardo is missing. Where did it go? Was it destroyed through accident or by malicious design? What was this girl holding in her hands? I premise it was a bouquet of … Continue reading

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A Sign of the Times?

Artists were not permitted to sign their paintings in the fifteenth century. Even the subjects’ identities were disguised under a layer of flattering (or covertly unflattering) iconography. Anagrams, puns, links to family crests, and professed virtues linger under ambiguous titles … Continue reading

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Seeing Double

Leonardo painted two ‘Madonna of the Rocks,’ so why not two Mona Lisas? Provenance is sketchy, but amongst the many copies of the ‘Mona Lisa’ by Leonardo’s students and admirers, one stands out as a possible second ‘Lisa.’ Spectro cameras … Continue reading

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What Raphael Saw

This is Raphael’s drawing of the ‘Mona Lisa,’ executed in situ when Leonardo da Vinci’s ground-breaking portrait was displayed for artist’s to copy, in 1504. Raphael was a faithful draftsman, so there’s no reason to believe he strayed from what … Continue reading

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